Wal-Mart: The Bully of Bentonville: How the High Cost of by Anthony Bianco

By Anthony Bianco

The biggest corporation on this planet through some distance, Wal-Mart takes in sales in far more than $280 billion, employs 1.4 million American staff, and controls a wide percentage of the enterprise performed by means of virtually each U.S. consumer-product corporation. greater than 138 million consumers stopover at considered one of its 5,300 shops each one week. yet Wal-Mart’s “everyday low costs” come at an immense expense to employees, providers, rivals, and consumers.The Bully of Bentonville exposes the zealous, secretive, small-town mentality that ideas Wal-Mart and chronicles its far-reaching results. In a gripping, richly textured narrative, Anthony Bianco indicates how Wal-Mart has pushed down retail wages in the course of the nation, how their substandard pay and meager health-care coverage and anti-union mentality have ended in a wide scales exploitation of employees, why their competitive growth unavoidably places in the community owned shops into bankruptcy, and the way their pricing regulations have compelled providers to outsource paintings and circulate millions of jobs out of the country. in accordance with interviews with Wal-Mart staff, managers, executives, rivals, providers, shoppers, and neighborhood leaders, The Bully of Bentonville brings the truths approximately Wal-Mart into sharp concentration.

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Extra info for Wal-Mart: The Bully of Bentonville: How the High Cost of Everyday Low Prices is Hurting America

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Hatred of unions was virtually a birthright in the Ozarks, where the natives were so protective of their independence (and so suspicious of one another) that they were loath to join forces even to build roads or cooperatively market farm products. Organized labor took a first run at Walton in 1970, when the Retail Clerks tried to sign up workers in a newly opened store in the Ozarks burg of Mexico, Missouri. It was a halfhearted attempt at best, but Walton sounded a red alert and called in John E.

Regional vice presidents were real road warriors, flying out to inspect their territories every Monday morning and returning to Bentonville on Thursday evening. Every other senior executive was expected to spend at least one day a week in the stores, taking the retail pulse where it beat strongest. M. on Friday at the latest for the weekly management meeting, which included all company officers and division heads and usually lasted all morning. At noon, the regional VPs met with all the merchandise buyers over sandwiches and iced tea.

Walton’s comments during the grand opening of the Washington store were prophetic. “I have a different feeling about this store than I’ve ever had,” Wal-Mart’s founder told the store’s 300 employees. “It’s a Wal-Mart, but it’s not a Wal-Mart. ” 45 A s Wal-Mart began to come of age as a corporation, Walton had little choice but to fill most newly created senior management positions with experienced managers from other, established retail chains. However, the second generation of home-office executives—which came to the fore in the 1980s and 1990s—was almost entirely homegrown and thoroughly indoctrinated in the Wal-Mart Way.

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