The Account of Mary Rowlandson and Other Indian Captivity by Mary Rowlandson, Horace Kephart

By Mary Rowlandson, Horace Kephart

Among the main celebrated captivity narratives, Rowlandson's account of her abduction by means of the Narragansett Indians in 1676 information her hardships and discomfort, besides important observations on local American existence. additionally contains 3 different recognized narratives of captivity one of the Delawares, the Iroquois, and the Indians of the Allegheny.

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I was not yet well able to march, but they took me in a canoe up the Alleghany River to an Indian town that was on the north side of the river, about forty miles above Fort Du Quesne. Here I remained about three weeks, and was then taken to an Indian town on the west branch of Muskingum, about twenty miles above the forks, which was called Tullihas, inhabited by Delawares, Caughnewagas, and Mohicans. The day after my arrival at the aforesaid town a number of Indians collected about me, and one of them began to pull the hair out of my head.

A few days after this the Indians demanded me, and I was obliged to go with them. I was not yet well able to march, but they took me in a canoe up the Alleghany River to an Indian town that was on the north side of the river, about forty miles above Fort Du Quesne. Here I remained about three weeks, and was then taken to an Indian town on the west branch of Muskingum, about twenty miles above the forks, which was called Tullihas, inhabited by Delawares, Caughnewagas, and Mohicans. The day after my arrival at the aforesaid town a number of Indians collected about me, and one of them began to pull the hair out of my head.

Tecaughretanego asked me to give them a particular account of what had happened from the time they left me yesterday until now. I told them the whole of the story, and they never interrupted me; but when I made a stop, the intervals were filled with loud exclamations of joy. As I could not at this time talk Ottawa or Jibewa well (which is nearly the same), I delivered my story in Caughnewaga. As my sister Molly’s husband was a Jibewa, and could understand Caughnewaga, he acted as interpreter, and delivered my story to the Jibewas and Ottawas, which they received with pleasure.

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