Research Needs for Radiation Protection: Recommendations of by Charles B. Meinhold

By Charles B. Meinhold

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Extra resources for Research Needs for Radiation Protection: Recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (Ncrp Report ; No. 117)

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This is perhaps most important in the development of models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, where the physical aspect of the radiation exposure is the best understood variable in the outcome. I n the carcinogenic process, the intervening stages between the deposition of energy in the affected cell and the endpoint of tumor development are dependent on a series of biochemical events each with an associated Likelihood of occurrence. ). 2 Characterization of Radiutwn Risks in Relation to Host Susceptibility Factors and Age at Exposure The development and function of the immune system may be altered by radiation exposure.

In recent years, the risk assessment community has been shifting from using the absolute risk model for projecting lifetime radiation risks to using the relative risk model for most cancer sites, which tends to fit the existing data better The constant (over time since irradiation) relative risk model predicts higher risks for the remaining, a s yet not observed, lifetime than does the absolute risk model. This is particularly pronounced for those exposed very early in life. Several recent 34 / 4.

It is well known that different dose-response relationships for internally deposited radionuclides can occur among various species including humans. Recognizing that much of our current knowledge in this area has been derived from studies in nonhuman systems, it is then necessary, in the extrapolation process from animals to humans, to understand and account for these dissimilarities which can arise a s a result of dosimetric differences among species and from variations i n the types and degrees of biologic response.

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