Identity, Memory, and Diaspora: Voices of Cuban-American by Jorge J. E. Gracia, Lynette M. F. Bosch, Isabel Alvarez

By Jorge J. E. Gracia, Lynette M. F. Bosch, Isabel Alvarez Borland

Deals a close photo of the lives of Cuban americans via interviews with artists, writers, and philosophers.

Show description

Read Online or Download Identity, Memory, and Diaspora: Voices of Cuban-American Artists, Writers, and Philosophers (S U N Y Series in Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture) PDF

Similar other social sciences books

Place, Commonality and Judgment: Continental Philosophy and the Ancient Greeks

During this very important and hugely unique booklet, position, commonality and judgment give you the framework during which works crucial to the Greek philosophical and literary culture are usefully situated and reinterpreted. Greek existence, it may be argued, used to be outlined via the interconnection of position, commonality and judgment.

Lebenswelt oder Natur. Schwacher Naturalismus und Naturbegriff bei Jürgen Habermas

In seinen neueren Veröffentlichungen tritt Jürgen Habermas immer wieder als prominenter Kritiker von Naturalismus und Szientismus auf. Er will die kommunikative Vernunft vor ihrer Reduktion auf die instrumentelle bewahren, ohne dabei hinter die Voraussetzungen dessen zurückzufallen, was once er nachmetaphysisches Denken nennt.

Extra info for Identity, Memory, and Diaspora: Voices of Cuban-American Artists, Writers, and Philosophers (S U N Y Series in Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture)

Sample text

The robe became the clothes of the Virgin Mary that covered the child—something like that— and the doves were my parents and since they had died, they were like the souls of my parents. That’s something that I came up with later on. When I composed the painting, I didn’t know exactly what I was doing. But somehow along the way I saw that the painting had some connections with those experiences. Something similar happened when I started the painting that is here. I saw this photograph of a painting of Goya, and I don’t know why I associated the fruits with the woman portrayed in the picture.

E. Gracia and Lynette M. F. ” [Calzada] “After I graduated, I worked for IBM for three years, but I wasn’t happy, so I quit. I came back to Miami and taught engineering at Miami Community College for about three more years, and at the same time I was building houses. I got a contractor’s license and built houses. But I wasn’t happy with that either. I then took painting as a hobby, just trying to find something else. . It wasn’t until 1975 that a friend of mine came to my house and said, ‘I’m friends with the director of the gallery at Bacardí, and in their office building they have a gallery, would you want to have an exhibition there?

And the styles and the art manifestations are in the end of man because each human being as a human being is looking at this world, and somehow he intuits how things are and he portrays that. In a way, art is like an X-ray, not only a photograph of man, but an X-ray. It goes deeper, it goes into the spirit of man and comes out in the works of art. Picasso had his idea of man and Velásquez had his own. And the theme is the same, it’s the artist in his studio, the other one is the apprentice of Velásquez, see.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.70 of 5 – based on 21 votes