Hazardous Future : Disaster, Representation and the by Isabel Capeloa Gil, Christoph Wulf

By Isabel Capeloa Gil, Christoph Wulf

The publication seeks to appreciate how societies and cultures care for catastrophe and the rhetorical ability they hotel to on the way to signify it. because tradition, the media and the humanities care for the belief and the processing of disaster, what sort of social wisdom does this strategy produce and the way does it give a contribution to the sustainable improvement of societies?

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The closest relatives of modern man – the carnivorous svelte Homo afarensis , the Australopithecus africanus, the herbivorous Australopithecus robustus, the East Asian Homo erectus, who perhaps already possessed fire, or the Neanderthal, who had a brain even larger than humans – all died out in a geologically short time period of less than 5 million years. According to Oeser (2011, 97-98), only in this way were modern humans able to develop without competition into what they are today: the unchallenged rulers of this world, able to spread throughout it and who, due to their vast superiority over all other organisms, know only a single enemy: they themselves.

Out of the conjunction between the upright gait, freeing up the hands, and this explosive brain growth, this “progressive cerebralization” rendered humans superior to all other organisms. The closest relatives of modern man – the carnivorous svelte Homo afarensis , the Australopithecus africanus, the herbivorous Australopithecus robustus, the East Asian Homo erectus, who perhaps already possessed fire, or the Neanderthal, who had a brain even larger than humans – all died out in a geologically short time period of less than 5 million years.

The upright gait was also associated with a strong development impetus for the brain and the adoption of stone tools. 5 million years ago. During a long phase in our prehistory, we remained nothing more than apes with an upright gait (Leakey and Lewin 1992, 99). Within a period of several hundred thousand years, the volume of the brain tripled. In view of the history of humankind, this development proved so very fast that it cannot simply be explained by the gradual development of natural selection.

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